Kirkwood Public Library

Apr 14, 2014

"I am the horizon
you ride towards, the thing you can never lasso"

—Margaret Atwood, “Backdrop addresses cowboy” (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

Apr 14, 2014

The State of America's Libraries, 2014

libraryadvocates:

The State of America’s Libraries 2014: A Report from the American Library Association is now online. This very special digital supplement details issues affecting public, academic, and school libraries this year and beyond. 

Inside you’ll find commentary and reporting on:

  • Ebooks, digital content, and copyright issues;
  • Library construction and renovation;
  • Outreach and diversity;
  • Libraries and community engagement;
  • Intellectual freedom;
  • Social networking;

Read this issue in the easy-to-use Zmag web browser format, or download it as a PDF for offline reading.

Apr 14, 2014

thelifeguardlibrarian:

For National Library Week, one of my favorites.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

For National Library Week, one of my favorites.

Apr 14, 2014

"I too am not a bit tamed[…]"

—Walt Whitman (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

Apr 14, 2014

"It’s still National Library Week. You should be especially nice to a librarian today, or tomorrow. Sometime this week, anyway. Probably the librarians would like tea. Or chocolates. Or a reliable source of funding."

Neil Gaiman (via ala-con)

chocolate is always good …

(via bkmuse7)

I’ll take tequila.

(via darienlibrary)

(via libraryjournal)

Apr 14, 2014

"Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing."

—Benjamin Franklin (b. 1706)

(Source: penamerican)

Apr 14, 2014

"At this point, it’s perversity that keeps me writing."

—When asked why she wrote her new book, Helen Oyeyemi said this.  (via millionsmillions)

Apr 14, 2014

2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners Include Donna Tartt, Annie Baker

Apr 9, 2014

Lynda Barry: The 20 stages of reading

Apr 9, 2014

Still Life with Breadcrumbs, by Anna Quindlen

Thelibrarylady has been remiss about reading books by this author who has a substantial list of prize-winning books. That being said I would say Anna Quindlen is an acquired taste.  Coming in at only 257 pages (this would be a good choice for a book club) I thought it would be an easy read. But it is filled with complications and “what might have beens” that keep the reader on her toes.
Sixty-year-old iconic photographer Rebecca Winter is hanging on to her life by her fingernails and is fast loosing her grip. Having to rent out out her over-priced New York City apartment (5800 a month) to support her mother in a nursing home (1900), maintenance for the apartment (1400), her father’s rent (1000), and the rent for the “Charming Country Cottage” which as it turns out is not (1000) leaves Rebecca  500 dollars a month to live on.  Did I mention her son Ben, who can use some extra cash too. Eventually she will barter with her photographs. 
The real story here is how she re-discovers herself. I know that sounds trite but that is exactly what happens. Still recovering from a verbally abusive marriage, she feels the stirrings of attraction from a roofer who removes an errant raccoon from her attic and strikes up a working friendship. Constantly looking for more income, she comes across a series of make-shift cross memorials in the forest surrounding her cottage.  And her life is never the same.