Kirkwood Public Library

Jul 17, 2014

dcpubliclibrary:

Thowing it back to a vintage DC Public Library display: “Books a Child’s Heritage,” ca. 1950 and some great children’s book covers! 
Photo from the DCPL Archives.

dcpubliclibrary:

Thowing it back to a vintage DC Public Library display: “Books a Child’s Heritage,” ca. 1950 and some great children’s book covers!

Photo from the DCPL Archives.

(via libraryadvocates)

Jul 17, 2014

uispeccoll:

Published in 1906 by A. &C. Black, Surrey is a beautiful guide book illustrated by Harold Sutton Palmer (1854-1933) and described by A.R. Hope Moncrieff (d.1927).  Moncrieff regularly wrote travel guides or “Black’s Guides” for A. & C. Black.  Black’s Guides were produced as early as 1839 and written in an informal style.  At the turn of the century Sutton Palmer began illustrating guide books for A. & C. Black.

Sutton Palmer traveled widely throughout the English countryside and specialized in rural landscape painting.  His exquisite watercolors elevate Surrey from a pedestrian travel guide to a work of art in itself.  Moncrieff correctly noted that his prose serves only to compliment Sutton Palmer’s landscapes and that the true focus of this book is the natural beauty of Surrey.

Makes me want to go picnicking and fishing!

-Jillian P.

DA670 .S96M7 1906

Jul 17, 2014

powells:

21 books you should finally finish reading this summer: http://powells.us/1stvQVD

powells:

21 books you should finally finish reading this summer: http://powells.us/1stvQVD

Jul 17, 2014

nationalbook:

Guess which National Book Award Author SNL alum Bill Hader thinks is a “complete genius”? (And also made Hader cry…)
Find out in Hader’s “By the Book” gab fest with The New York Times Sunday Book Review here.
Illustration by Jillian Tamaki

nationalbook:

Guess which National Book Award Author SNL alum Bill Hader thinks is a “complete genius”? (And also made Hader cry…)

Find out in Hader’s “By the Book” gab fest with The New York Times Sunday Book Review here.

Illustration by Jillian Tamaki

Jul 17, 2014

politicsprose:

libraryjournal:

deystreetbooks:

We’re thrilled to finally reveal the cover and title of Amy Poehler’s forthcoming book - Yes Please is on sale 10/28/14.
Watch the cover reveal on Today!

Have you ordered your copies yet?

[X]
http://bit.ly/AmySaysYesPlease

politicsprose:

libraryjournal:

deystreetbooks:

We’re thrilled to finally reveal the cover and title of Amy Poehler’s forthcoming book - Yes Please is on sale 10/28/14.

Watch the cover reveal on Today!

Have you ordered your copies yet?

[X]

Jul 17, 2014

politicsprose:

vintageanchorbooks:

"There are nineteen rules governing literary art in domain of romantic fiction — some say twenty-two. In “Deerslayer,” Cooper violated eighteen of them. These eighteen require:1. That a tale shall accomplish something and arrive somewhere. But the “Deerslayer” tale accomplishes nothing and arrives in air.
2. They require that the episodes in a tale shall be necessary parts of the tale, and shall help to develop it. But as the “Deerslayer” tale is not a tale, and accomplishes nothing and arrives nowhere, the episodes have no rightful place in the work, since there was nothing for them to develop.3. They require that the personages in a tale shall be alive, except in the case of corpses, and that always the reader shall be able to tell the corpses from the others. But this detail has often been overlooked in the “Deerslayer” tale.4. They require that the personages in a tale, both dead and alive, shall exhibit a sufficient excuse for being there. But this detail also has been overlooked in the “Deerslayer” tale.5. They require that when the personages of a tale deal in conversation, the talk shall sound like human talk, and be talk such as human beings would be likely to talk in the given circumstances, and have a discoverable meaning, also a discoverable purpose, and a show of relevancy, and remain in the neighborhood of the subject at hand, and be interesting to the reader, and help out the tale, and stop when the people cannot think of anything more to say. But this requirement has been ignored from the beginning of the “Deerslayer” tale to the end of it.6. They require that when the author describes the character of a personage in the tale, the conduct and conversation of that personage shall justify said description. But this law gets little or no attention in the “Deerslayer” tale, as Natty Bumppo’s case will amply prove.7. They require that when a personage talks like an illustrated, gilt-edged, tree-calf, hand-tooled, seven- dollar Friendship’s Offering in the beginning of a paragraph, he shall not talk like a negro minstrel in the end of it. But this rule is flung down and danced upon in the “Deerslayer” tale.8. They require that crass stupidities shall not be played upon the reader as “the craft of the woodsman, the delicate art of the forest,” by either the author or the people in the tale. But this rule is persistently violated in the “Deerslayer” tale.9. They require that the personages of a tale shall confine themselves to possibilities and let miracles alone; or, if they venture a miracle, the author must so plausibly set it forth as to make it look possible and reasonable. But these rules are not respected in the “Deerslayer” tale.10. They require that the author shall make the reader feel a deep interest in the personages of his tale and in their fate; and that he shall make the reader love the good people in the tale and hate the bad ones. But the reader of the “Deerslayer” tale dislikes the good people in it, is indifferent to the others, and wishes they would all get drowned together.11. They require that the characters in a tale shall be so clearly defined that the reader can tell beforehand what each will do in a given emergency. But in the “Deerslayer” tale, this rule is vacated.In addition to these large rules, there are some little ones. These require that the author shall:12. Say what he is proposing to say, not merely come near it.
13. Use the right word, not its second cousin.
14. Eschew surplusage.
15. Not omit necessary details.
16. Avoid slovenliness of form.
17. Use good grammar.
18. Employ a simple and straightforward style.”— Mark TwainTwain published “Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offenses” on this day in 1895. The article lists nineteen “rules governing literary art in the domain of romantic fiction,” and attempts to show that Cooper broke all but one of them. Source: http://ow.ly/zghPS; Read the full piece by Twain here: http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/HNS/Indians/offense.html

Mark Twain throwing some serious literary shade. Emphasis my own.

politicsprose:

vintageanchorbooks:

"There are nineteen rules governing literary art in domain of romantic fiction — some say twenty-two. In “Deerslayer,” Cooper violated eighteen of them. These eighteen require:

1. That a tale shall accomplish something and arrive somewhere. But the “Deerslayer” tale accomplishes nothing and arrives in air.

2. They require that the episodes in a tale shall be necessary parts of the tale, and shall help to develop it. But as the “Deerslayer” tale is not a tale, and accomplishes nothing and arrives nowhere, the episodes have no rightful place in the work, since there was nothing for them to develop.

3. They require that the personages in a tale shall be alive, except in the case of corpses, and that always the reader shall be able to tell the corpses from the others. But this detail has often been overlooked in the “Deerslayer” tale.

4. They require that the personages in a tale, both dead and alive, shall exhibit a sufficient excuse for being there. But this detail also has been overlooked in the “Deerslayer” tale.

5. They require that when the personages of a tale deal in conversation, the talk shall sound like human talk, and be talk such as human beings would be likely to talk in the given circumstances, and have a discoverable meaning, also a discoverable purpose, and a show of relevancy, and remain in the neighborhood of the subject at hand, and be interesting to the reader, and help out the tale, and stop when the people cannot think of anything more to say. But this requirement has been ignored from the beginning of the “Deerslayer” tale to the end of it.

6. They require that when the author describes the character of a personage in the tale, the conduct and conversation of that personage shall justify said description. But this law gets little or no attention in the “Deerslayer” tale, as Natty Bumppo’s case will amply prove.

7. They require that when a personage talks like an illustrated, gilt-edged, tree-calf, hand-tooled, seven- dollar Friendship’s Offering in the beginning of a paragraph, he shall not talk like a negro minstrel in the end of it. But this rule is flung down and danced upon in the “Deerslayer” tale.

8. They require that crass stupidities shall not be played upon the reader as “the craft of the woodsman, the delicate art of the forest,” by either the author or the people in the tale. But this rule is persistently violated in the “Deerslayer” tale.

9. They require that the personages of a tale shall confine themselves to possibilities and let miracles alone; or, if they venture a miracle, the author must so plausibly set it forth as to make it look possible and reasonable. But these rules are not respected in the “Deerslayer” tale.

10. They require that the author shall make the reader feel a deep interest in the personages of his tale and in their fate; and that he shall make the reader love the good people in the tale and hate the bad ones. But the reader of the “Deerslayer” tale dislikes the good people in it, is indifferent to the others, and wishes they would all get drowned together.

11. They require that the characters in a tale shall be so clearly defined that the reader can tell beforehand what each will do in a given emergency. But in the “Deerslayer” tale, this rule is vacated.

In addition to these large rules, there are some little ones. These require that the author shall:

12. Say what he is proposing to say, not merely come near it.

13. Use the right word, not its second cousin.

14. Eschew surplusage.

15. Not omit necessary details.

16. Avoid slovenliness of form.

17. Use good grammar.

18. Employ a simple and straightforward style.”
— Mark Twain

Twain published “Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offenses” on this day in 1895. The article lists nineteen “rules governing literary art in the domain of romantic fiction,” and attempts to show that Cooper broke all but one of them. Source: http://ow.ly/zghPS; Read the full piece by Twain here: http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/HNS/Indians/offense.html

Mark Twain throwing some serious literary shade. Emphasis my own.

Jul 17, 2014

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 
http://to.pbs.org/1oYpUid

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

(via politicsprose)

Jul 10, 2014

libraryjournal:

Book-Cut Artworks by Thomas Allen

via fer1972

Now this is what I call pulp fiction!

Jul 10, 2014

nationalbook:

Flavorwire shares “50 Essential Cult Novels

(via politicsprose)

Jul 10, 2014

nprfreshair:

Maureen Corrigan reviews the 10th anniversary edition of Jacqueline Winspear’s English mystery, Maisie Dobbs, set during WWI: 

"Rereading Maisie Dobbs has made me appreciate anew its subtler strengths—the strengths of a mystery that does a really fine job of playing within the traditional boundaries of the genre.  It’s Winspear’s command of the period detail of Maisie’s Georgian and World War I world, as well as Maisie’s own quiet smarts that make the novel compelling.  Born working class, teenaged intellectual prodigy Maisie toils as a maid in a London townhouse until the day her aristocratic employer catches her in the library reading the philosophical works of David Hume and sends her to Girton College at Cambridge. I know, I know.  This fantasy of benevolent despotism is as bad as the more cloying aspects of Downton Abbey.  But, the occasional sentimental weaknesses of Maisie Dobbs are more than offset by the novel’s sober awareness of all its heroine must give up in order to make her class climb.  When young Maisie leaves the scullery for university, one of her fellow servants comments that:  “Fish can’t survive long out of water… .”  Indeed her solitude puts Maisie in the alienated company of every other first-class detective from Edgar Allan Poe’s Auguste Dupin onward. “

1907 St. Pancras Train Station, London via Topical Press Agency / Getty Images

Maureen Corrigan is a friend of mine and I’m always blown away by her reviews!

nprfreshair:

Maureen Corrigan reviews the 10th anniversary edition of Jacqueline Winspear’s English mystery, Maisie Dobbs, set during WWI: 

"Rereading Maisie Dobbs has made me appreciate anew its subtler strengths—the strengths of a mystery that does a really fine job of playing within the traditional boundaries of the genre.  It’s Winspear’s command of the period detail of Maisie’s Georgian and World War I world, as well as Maisie’s own quiet smarts that make the novel compelling.  Born working class, teenaged intellectual prodigy Maisie toils as a maid in a London townhouse until the day her aristocratic employer catches her in the library reading the philosophical works of David Hume and sends her to Girton College at Cambridge. I know, I know.  This fantasy of benevolent despotism is as bad as the more cloying aspects of Downton Abbey.  But, the occasional sentimental weaknesses of Maisie Dobbs are more than offset by the novel’s sober awareness of all its heroine must give up in order to make her class climb.  When young Maisie leaves the scullery for university, one of her fellow servants comments that:  “Fish can’t survive long out of water… .”  Indeed her solitude puts Maisie in the alienated company of every other first-class detective from Edgar Allan Poe’s Auguste Dupin onward.

1907 St. Pancras Train Station, London via Topical Press Agency / Getty Images

Maureen Corrigan is a friend of mine and I’m always blown away by her reviews!